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The mental health of Asian Americans

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Published by Jossey-Bass in San Francisco .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Asian Americans -- Mental health.,
  • Asian Americans -- Mental health services.,
  • Mental health services -- United States.,
  • Asian americans -- Psychology.,
  • Mental health.,
  • Mental disorders.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementStanley Sue, James K. Morishima.
SeriesThe Jossey-Bass social and behavioral science series
ContributionsMorishima, James K.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRC451.5.A75 S93 1982
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 222 p. :
Number of Pages222
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3506773M
ISBN 100875895352
LC Control Number82048060

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Asian American Mental Health is a state-of-the-art compendium of the conceptual issues, empirical literature, methodological approaches, and practice guidelines for conducting culturally informed assessments of Asian Americans, and for assessing provider cultural competency within individuals and systems. It is the first of its kind on Asian Americans. Summary: This book critically reviews the literature on Asian American mental health. It then applies this knowledge to suggest improved ways of helping members of Asian ethnic groups, including Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, Vietnamese, and Samoans. Asian American Mental Health is a state-of-the-art compendium of the conceptual issues, empirical literature, methodological approaches, and . Asian American Mental Health is a state-of-the-art compendium of the conceptual issues, empirical literature, methodological approaches, and practice guidelines for conducting culturally informed assessments of Asian Americans, and for assessing provider cultural competency within individuals and systems.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AA/PIs) are diverse in ethnicity (See Figure ) and in their historical experiences in the United States. As many as 43 different ethnic groups (Lee, ) have struggled as immigrants, refugees, or American-born Asian Americans to overcome prejudice and discrimination on the path to achievements ranging from the building of the first .   May is both Mental Health Awareness Month and Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month (AAPI for short).The more you think about it, the more the two sharing a month kind of makes sense: Asian American teen girls have the highest rates of depressive symptoms of any ethnic and gender group, Southeast Asian Americans experience high stress due to the threat of deportations, and Asian. The results indicated that about half of Asian Americans with severe mental health needs sought mental health services, a rate higher than the general population. Furthermore, those Asian Americans with severe mental health needs often received services from a mental health specialist or through both mental health services and general medical : Xia Wang. Recent data collected from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) found that Asian Americans have a percent overall lifetime rate of any psychiatric disorder and a percent month rate, yet Asian Americans are three times less likely to seek mental health services than Whites.

In Handbook of Mental Health and Acculturation in Asian American Families, distinguished researchers and clinicians discuss the process of acculturation for individuals and their families, addressing the mental health needs of Asian Americans and thoroughly examining the acculturative process, its common stressors, and characteristics associated with resiliency. Thought-provoking and informative, Handbook of Mental Health and Acculturation in Asian American Families will enhance the understanding of the clinical and sociocultural problems Asian Americans face, providing clinicians with all the necessary insights to . Asian Americans make up 4% of the United States population, roughly 11 million people from China, India, Korea, the Philippines, Southeast Asia and Vietnam. Despite the high risk for depression, language barriers, social stigma and availability make mental health care virtually obsolete among this growing minority. The National Latino and Asian American Study also found that second-generation immigrants are more likely than their parents to be diagnosed with mental health disorders, something that Dr. .